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File #: 19-5481    Version: 1 Name: Health Department Rules Governing the Control of Rabies and Zoonoses
Type: Public Hearing Status: Public Hearing
File created: 5/24/2019 In control: Attorney’s Office
On agenda: 6/18/2019 Final action:
Title: : Health Department Rules Governing the Control of Rabies and Zoonoses
Attachments: 1. General Statute G.S. 19A Article 3Animal Welfare Act, 2. General Statute G.S. 130A Article 6 Rabies, 3. NASPHVRabiesCompendium, 4. 19-5481 Rabies and Zoonoses Redline.pdf, 5. Rabies and Zoonoses Rule
Date Ver.Action ByActionResultAction DetailsMeeting DetailsVideo
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Title:
Health Department Rules Governing the Control of Rabies and Zoonoses

Summary
ACTION:
Adopt revised Mecklenburg County Health Department Rules Governing the Control of Rabies and Zoonoses

Staff Contact: Tyrone C. Wade, County Attorney


Presentation: No


BACKGROUND/JUSTIFICATION:
In May 1999, the Board of County Commissioners adopted the current Mecklenburg County Rabies and Zoonoses Ordinance. The Ordinance, as then adopted, followed the statutory requirements in place at the time. Since that time the state has revised the guidelines for handling rabies cases.

Until recently, the research strongly suggested the need for euthanasia or six-month quarantine for animals that were exposed to rabies but never vaccinated or exposed but were overdue for vaccination. There were strict requirements as to what procedure had to be followed. Recent guidance from the National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians (NASPHV) has recommended changes to the prior protocol for handling post exposure rabies cases. The guidance from NASPHV was published in March 2016 and provided new information on how public health offcials should manage exposure for dogs, cats and ferrets. This revised NASPHV guidance recommends a complex approach that differentiates between animals that have been vaccinated versus those that are overdue.

In 2017 the General Assembly revised the statutes that govern post exposure management under S.L.2017-106 and removed all the language that previously required euthanasia or quarantine. The law now refers directly to the NASPHV guidance. In light of the statutory changes, the NC Division of Public Health sent health department directors a memorandum recommending they adopt the NASPHV guidance.

The County's current Ordinance is not consistent with the state statute and duplicates services. Additionally, the County will no longer need the Ordinance as currently written regarding animal holding facilities permits; licensing and record...

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